She defended herself in court and yet lost

She defended herself in court and yet lost

He had used up the money he had saved, he had high debts, and his reputation with family and friends was gone. That is one of the reasons why he stayed in Benin City, like most of the returnees. They can’t go home. Left alone, those who have already gone through hell ask themselves if they should try again. Happiness and Nosa cannot offer legal routes to Europe either.

You keep going, trying to convince people to stay here, even if the resistance is great. “I am being threatened. Several smugglers have already told me: I’ll give you money if you stop spreading these stories,” says Nosa.

This story is published in cooperation with the magazine “chrismon”. 1.6 million copies of the magazine of the Evangelical Church are included in major daily and weekly newspapers every month – including “Süddeutsche Zeitung”, “Die Zeit”, “Die Welt”, “Welt Kompakt”, “Welt am Sonntag” ( Northern Germany), “FAZ” (Frankfurt, Rhein-Main), “Leipziger Volkszeitung” and “Dresdner Latest News”. The extended edition “chrismon plus” is available by subscription and in train station and airport bookshops. More at: www.chrismon.de

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Rome (dpa) – Rescuers of migrants in the Mediterranean can be punished even more severely in Italy in the future if they travel illegally with their ships into the territorial waters of the country.

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A security law approved by the Italian Senate on Monday provides for fines of up to one million euros and also allows authorities to confiscate ships.mockingbird sample

The government had asked the vote of confidence for the law to be passed more quickly. This step made no further changes to the draft already approved by the Chamber of Deputies. The right-wing Interior Minister Matteo Salvini commented on Twitter that the law provides for “more powers for the security forces, more controls at the borders, more men to arrest Mafiosi and Camorristi (members of the Camorra Mafia)”.

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The law is based on an emergency ordinance passed in June, which loses its validity on August 13 and therefore had to be converted into law. The so-called security decree, which goes back to Salvini, already provided for fines of between 10,000 and 50,000 euros if the captain of a rescue ship crossed the sea border without permission.

The new measures are highly controversial. Not only aid organizations themselves criticized the previously issued decree, but also, for example, the United Nations.

Meanwhile, the aid organizations SOS Méditerranée and Doctors Without Borders are on their way to the rescue zone in the Mediterranean off the Libyan coast. The new ship “Ocean Viking” left the port of Marseille on Sunday evening and was sailing west of Corsica and Sardinia on Monday. The “Alan Kurdi” of the German aid organization Sea-Eye was already north of the Libyan capital Tripoli after rescued migrants were handed over to Malta.

With the “Ocean Viking”, the currently largest ship of the sea rescuers is expected to arrive in international waters off Libya by the end of the week. The predecessor ship “Aquarius” from SOS Méditerranée and Doctors Without Borders had ceased operations in 2018. The “Ocean Viking” sails under the Norwegian flag and, according to SOS, used to be a rescue and emergency ship for oil production facilities in the North Sea. It can accommodate around 200 people and has a clinic.

In addition to SOS Méditerranée, Doctors Without Borders and Sea-Eye, the Spanish organization Proactiva Open Arms is also back in action – however, their ship is holding out in the Mediterranean with rescued migrants on board. Italy’s right-wing populist interior minister Matteo Salvini had refused the ship entry into a port after the rescue of more than 120 people. “We will continue to take care of them while Europe does not react,” wrote the organization on Twitter.

48 migrants reached the Italian island of Lampedusa by boat from Libya on Monday, volunteers from the evangelical organization Mediterranean Hope said on Twitter. The survivors reported that several people went overboard during the two-day crossing.

The central Mediterranean is one of the most dangerous escape routes for people who want to come to Europe. Mediterranean countries like Italy, Malta and Spain insist that other EU countries also take over migrants rescued in the Mediterranean. However, the EU has not yet been able to agree on a distribution mechanism for those seeking protection. A solution is therefore sought again after every rescue. According to the EU Commissioner Dimitris Avramopoulos, who is responsible for migration, in the case of the “Alan Kurdi”, Germany, Portugal, France and Luxembourg also agreed to take on migrants.

Good news from Nuremberg: Many of the asylum seekers who have come to Germany since 2015 have work. But many shy away from training and prefer to do helper activities.

According to the Institute for Employment Research (IAB), asylum seekers in Germany are increasingly finding employment. “Among the employable people who have come to us since 2015 from the eight important countries of origin of asylum Syria, Afghanistan, Iraq, Eritrea, Pakistan, Nigeria, Somalia and Iran, around 35 percent are in employment,” said the acting IAB Director Ulrich Walwei of “Welt” . “That’s around 400,000 people, and the number is rising.”

However, only a few asylum seekers do vocational training, according to Walwei there are currently 44,000 from the eight countries. “Overall, the refugees’ propensity for training can still be increased,” he said. However, training is also demanding. Even better support and training are needed here.

Temporary work is important for entry

Among the 400,000 immigrants who found employment, almost half were volunteers, Walwei told the newspaper. A great many are employed through temporary employment agencies, which generally play an important role in the entry of immigrants into the labor market. It usually involves simple production activities. 

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The so-called economic services outside of temporary work are also important, which is often the cleaning trade. Asylum seekers also often find a job in catering and agriculture.

Sources used: AFP news agency

She defended herself in court and yet lost. A female official from Australia lost her job due to tweets critical of the government – and rightly so, a court ruled in last resort. 

An officer in Australia has been fired because of Twitter messages against the government’s refugee policy. The country’s Supreme Court ruled in Canberra on Wednesday that the dismissal was legal. The woman wrote the tweets under a different name, but was then exposed. In total, around two million Australian civil servants are affected by the judgment, who have to hold back on social networks. 

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 The High Court ruled in the last resort that the woman named Michaela Banerji – a former employee of the immigration authorities – was in breach of her official duties. Australia’s chief judges dismissed their claims for compensation. If officials were allowed to publicly criticize their own government or members of parliament, this would undermine the public’s trust in the administration. This also applies to anonymously written expressions of opinion.

Sources used: dpa news agency 

What happened on the set of the Italian film “Tolo Tolo”? According to members of the film crew, several dozen extras, all of them refugees, are said to have been treated inhumanely.

According to a newspaper report, around 60 refugees were apparently mistreated on the set of an Italian film in Malta in order to make the scenes appear more realistic. The originally from Africa migrants were hired as extras for the film “Tolo Tolo”, reported the “Times of Malta” on Wednesday. The scenes with them should have seemed more realistic because of the abuse. There were therefore four children among those affected.

The newspaper cited members of the film crew who reported that the refugees had to sit on a boat for six hours without drinking water in the blazing sun. They were therefore denied access to the toilet. Most of those affected were non-swimmers. A pregnant woman panicked, whereupon she was brought ashore by the filmmakers, the newspaper wrote.

At least four members of the film crew resigned after the incident, it said in the newspaper report. “They let these refugees relive what they went through, without any sensitivity or supervision,” said one of the former employees.

Filmmakers deny allegations

The Maltese production company Halo Pictures, which oversees the recordings in Malta, denied the allegations and stressed that they have not violated local laws. All the necessary health and safety precautions have been taken. Company boss Engelbert Grech said the allegations were an act of sabotage by a disgruntled former employee. The Italian producers of the film said, according to the Times of Malta, the allegations “came out of nowhere”. 

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 The Maltese Film Commission, which is committed to ensuring that films are made on the Mediterranean island, has launched an investigation into the allegations.

Sources used: AFP news agency

Erfurt (dpa) – The umbrella organization of the municipal integration advisory councils has called for a municipal right to vote for foreigners living permanently in Germany.

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This is already in practice in more than half of the EU countries, said the chairman of the Federal Immigration and Integration Council (BZI), Lajos Fischer, at a symposium of his organization in Erfurt.

Local voting rights should apply to people with a migration background who have been in Germany for more than three years. They should get the same rights as EU citizens. “They live in the municipalities, pay taxes, raise their children here and are not allowed to have a say,” criticized Fischer. For such a municipal right to vote, the Basic Law would have to be changed.

The BZI also called for the facilitation of multiple citizenships and nationwide state-financed anti-discrimination agencies in order to be able to fight racism consistently.